Wilsons Promontory Southern Circuit Day 2

Oberon Bay to Roaring Meg (10.9 km)

It was still early at 9am when I left the camp. Surprisingly it took only 45min to walk to Telegraph Junction — it looked longer on the map. The track was sandy and for most parts it was very wide and vegetation had been cleared by heavy equipment. At Telegraph Junction the track turned into gravel road and once I got even passed by a parks maintenance vehicle. It didn’t really give me the feeling of being in a remote location.

Half an hour later I was at Halfway Hut and stopped for a snack, and to fill my water bottles. The track continued on the gravel road and went up fairly steep to a helipad at the top of the hill, from where I left the vehicle track to take a separate walking track down to Roaring Meg campsite.

Halfway Hut
Halfway Hut

I was at the campsite at lunch time, and there was a crew of parks staff clearing dead branches from trees that had been affected by bushfires — most likely to prevent branches from falling down onto tents.

I sat down with them for lunch and listened to some of their stories. Working in a National Park is one of the greatest jobs you can get.

Roaring Meg campsite
Roaring Meg campsite

Around 1pm I left my backpack behind, took my cameras and my daypack and walked the side track down to South Point — the most southerly point on mainland Australia. It’s a nice walk down to the water and some beautifully coloured rocks, but other than that and a sign with geo coordinates there’s nothing really there. The greatest part of the walk was a large flock of Gang Gang Cockatoos I saw.

At 3pm I was back at the camp and just in time the park workers finished on the lower part of the campground, so I started setting up my camp there, next to the creek, which was the only water source.

South Point
South Point

While I set up my camp, Robin, a German hiker, arrived and stayed. He walked the same circuit as I did, only in the other direction, so he just came from the lighthouse.

After Robin set up his camp he went to walk the sidetrack to South Point. Meanwhile I cooked myself dinner. Unfortunately just when I had finished cooking it started to rain, so I quickly had to move all my stuff and food inside the tent. Soon later it was all dark outside anyway.

South Point
South Point

Later the rain stopped for a few minutes — enough time to get out and brush my teeth, but it then continued to rain throughout he night.


More photos of this walk are in the album Wilsons Promontory — Southern Circuit.